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20130201
20130228
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KRCB (PBS) 5
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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Feb 11, 2013 9:00pm PST
place. back then, the u.s. was in the catbird seat, poised to lead the world down this astonishing new superhighway of information and innovation. now many other countries offer their citizens faster and cheaper access than we do. the faster high-speed access comes through fiber optic lines that transmit data in bursts of laser light, but many of us are still hooked up to broadband connections that squeeze digital information through copper wire. we're stuck with this old-fashioned technology because, as susan crawford explains, our government has allowed a few giant conglomerates to rig the rules, raise prices, and stifle competition. just like standard oil in the first gilded age a century ago. in those days, it was muckrakers like ida tarbell and lincoln steffens rattling the cages and calling for fair play. today it's independent thinkers like susan crawford. the big telecom industry wishes she would go away, but she's got a lot of people on her side. in fact, if you go to the white house citizen's petition site, you'll see how fans of "captive audience" are calling on the presiden
PBS
Jan 31, 2013 11:00pm PST
and a nobel prize. >> the role of the u.s. changing, something we need to address as americans. and i set out to try to discover how these multiple revolutionary changes are interrelating one with another. and atchoishey pose to us, how we really have to get involved in steering our way into the future. and choosing options that can make it better than it otherwise might be. >> a conversation with al gore, next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. al gore grew newspaper tennessee and lived in washington d.c. the son of a united states senator. he then went to harvard, went back to tennessee, became a congressman and then a senator, then vice president and inn 2,000 he ran for president and he lost. then after some soul-searching he began to decide what he wanted to do. he was an environmental activist and for that work in 2007 he won an oscar for his documentary, an inconvenient truth. that year he also won the nobel peace prize. his latest book is called "the futurist" i s
PBS
Feb 14, 2013 9:00pm PST
of skilled policy advocates driving a remarkable turnaround that has already changed the u.s. political landscape. >> warming isn't, in fact, accelerating. in fact, there's been none for 15 years. >> hockenberry: there's christopher monckton, a big draw at these meetings, who brings the skeptics to their feet every time. >> god bless america. >> hockenberry: republican congressman james sensenbrenner of wisconsin, vice chairman of the use science committee. >> paul krugman accused my colleagues and me of treason against the planet. (laughter) >> hockenberry: there's chris horner from the competitive enterprise institute... >> ...economic salvation. this is our way out. >> hockenberry: and james taylor, senior flow at the heartland institute, organizer of this gathering. >> the debate indeed is over. in the years prior to 2007, the 2008 elections, we actually heard from many folks that we should tone it down on global warming, we should not talk about the issue, because the court of public opinion had already decided and we were on the losing end. but we believe that if we present the ca
PBS
Feb 13, 2013 5:30pm PST
and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income taoury. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in deces. >> cau theyre locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, the investment, the call for the investment in univers
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)